3 to read: How Trump killed ‘he said she said’ journalism | What (digital) news looked like on 9/11 | Facebook gets a whupping

By Matt Carroll <@MattatMIT>

Sept. 27, 2016: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.com.

  1. How Trump means the death of ‘he said, she said’ journalism: While you’re still digesting last night’s presidential debate, here’s an interesting take on how Trump’s constant lying has changed how reporters cover a major political figure. Essentially, his allergy to the truth has driven journalists to take off their gloves and call him out. Nice piece by Peter Beinart for The Atlantic. In a related story in the WaPo by Erik Wemple, the NYT’s new managing editor, Joe Kahn, answers this question: “Would we have a staff left if we listened to Donald Trump?”
  2. What (digital) news looked like on 9/11: It was only 15 years ago, but news sites are light years different than they were on the day America suffered its worst terrorist attack. Design changes and technical improvements make today’s pages look so much more sophisticated, while those pages look relatively primitive. Check it out. Nice work by Louis Anslow for Timeline.
  3. Facebook is being taken somewhere it never wanted to go: Emily Bell, director of Columbia’s Tow Center, takes Facebook to the woodshed for a proper whupping, after the debacle over its video ad screwup and its censorship of the one of the great war photos of all time. It’s a fun read, if you don’t happen to work for FB.

BONUS: Why I’m (a little more) optimistic about newsroom revenue: It’s not about one huge river of advertising. It’s about many small streams, from many sources, which are replicable. (By yours truly.)

  • Get notified via email: Send note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll runs the Future of News initiative at the MIT Media Lab.

Advertisements

The best: ONA award winners | Electionland for accountability | Where’s podcasting headed?

By Matt Carroll <@MattatMIT>

Sept. 20, 2016: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.com.

  1. And the winner is: The Online News Association’s award winners: For the latest, very best in online storytelling, there’s no better short list than the ONA award winners. Some terrific reads here, with strong mixes of innovative storytelling techniques married to old-fashioned shoe leather reporting. One (if grim) example, The Globe & Mail’s The Taken, about indigenous women murdered by serial killers.
  2. Electionland: A cooperative effort to track problems at the polls: As newsrooms learn to cope with the new digital landscape, one tactic they are increasingly relying on is cooperation. Now a broad coalition of news orgs, from ProPublica to the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, with support from Google, will work together, using technology and data, to look for problems on election day, writes Olivia Ma, Google News Lab’s head of partnerships. Electionland is an interesting experiment. I’m curious to see what comes of it.
  3. What’s the future of podcasting?: Serial made people take podcasting seriously, but it’s still small. Most podcasts are heard by only a relatively few people. On the other hand, but it is growing, and fast. Ken Doctor dissects where podcasting is headed for Nieman Lab.
  • Get notified via email: Send note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll runs the Future of News initiative at the MIT Media Lab.

3 to read: How Arianna lost her newsroom | A lost generation of journos | Why go into journalism?

By Matt Carroll <@MattatMIT>

Sept. 13, 2016: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.com.

  1. How Arianna Huffington lost her newsroom: One of the pioneers of digital journalism alienated her newsroom through her willingness to sacrifice editorial standards when it came to covering her friends — who ranged from the Dalai Lama to Bill Maher. A blistering critique of someone who lost her way, by William D. Cohan of VANITY FAIR.
  2. A lost generation of journalists: It’s been a brutal decade for many experienced newspaper journalists across the country over the past decade, as layoffs and closures have transformed the face of the profession. A Kansas professor, who just happened to start studying journalists as the crisis hit, wrote a book about what he calls “Journalism’s Lost Generation.” It’s as depressing as the title sounds. An interview with Prof. Scott Reinardy, by Deron Lee of Columbia Jrn Review.
  3. Why go into journalism?: After the last piece, I thought people might need a little pick-me-up. This is it. John Harris, editor-in-chief of Politico, writes a thoughtful essay on why a young person would decide to become a journalist. Partly, he writes, it’s because the work allows you to “ask people questions, to follow personal curiosity where it will take you.” But maybe the greater answer (for many) is that in “modest ways every day, and in large ways on big occasions, we are making the world a better place.” An inspiring read.

Matt Carroll runs the Future of News initiative at the MIT Media Lab.

3 to read: How cartoons are changing journalism | Amazon’s Alexa delivers the news | The puzzle behind a puzzle

By Matt Carroll <@MattatMIT>

Sept. 7, 2016: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.com.

  1. How cartoons are changing the rules of journalism: Perhaps you’ve read the number of full-time editorial cartoonists has dropped. But that story is not complete — cartoons have jumped from a single-frame, political box to evolve into a long-read, sophisticated story-telling tool. It’s exploded in directions that would have been unimaginable a few years ago. Some examples: Stories about kids with drug-addicted parents and an investigation into narco-terrorists. An interesting take by Shan Wang for Nieman Lab.
  2. Alexa, give me news: Amazon’s Alexa, the voice-powered speaker, is a huge hit. How newsrooms are figuring out the best ways to work with the AI software and provide news to listeners. From Joseph Lichterman at Nieman Lab.
  3. The cool story behind a newly-famous NYT crossword puzzle: Something a little lighter — I’m not a crossword person, but I love a good puzzle, and this is damn cool. The Times published a crossword puzzle in which certain answers could be read in two different ways (eg: “Black Halloween animal” could be either BAT or CAT.) It’s obviously a difficult accomplishment to create a puzzle like this, but even cooler is that the general theme fit perfectly with the ambiguous answers: “GENDER FLUID.” A nice story-behind-the-story piece by Oliver Roeder for Slate.

Matt Carroll runs the Future of News initiative at the MIT Media Lab.