3 to read: Saying No to Trump | Censorship factories | Tips to deal with disinformation

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 12, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Why networks should say No to Trump: The president addressed the nation about immigration last week. Margaret Sullivan at the WaPo argues convincingly that the networks should turn away from Trump, next time he wants to use free air time to spread “propaganda.” In his talk, the president offered up no news, but did repeat again and again exaggerated and false information. So what’s the point?, she asks. A good read.

A peek inside China’s ‘censorship factories’: China is big on censoring news, whether it’s about certain political issues or an ominous empty chair. No news there. But the NYT provides a glimpse of what’s like to work inside one of the “censorship factories,” where low-paid people work to scrub the words of 800 million daily users. It’s a fascinating take.

5 lessons for reporting in an age of disinformation: Good tips from Claire Wardle at First Draft News about how to train reporters from being manipulated. Some ideas: Train your newsroom in disinformation tactics and techniques; do more reporting that helps explain the issues that are often the subjects of disinformation campaigns.

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3 to read: Saying No to Trump | Censorship factories | Tips to deal with disinformation

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 12, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Why networks should say No to Trump: The president addressed the nation about immigration last week. Margaret Sullivan at the WaPo argues convincingly that the networks should turn away from Trump, next time he wants to use free air time to spread “propaganda.” In his talk, the president offered up no news, but did repeat again and again exaggerated and false information. So what’s the point?, she asks. A good read.

A peek inside China’s ‘censorship factories’: China is big on censoring news, whether it’s about certain political issues or an ominous empty chair. No news there. But the NYT provides a glimpse of what’s like to work inside one of the “censorship factories,” where low-paid people work to scrub the words of 800 million daily users. It’s a fascinating take.

5 lessons for reporting in an age of disinformation: Good tips from Claire Wardle at First Draft News about how to train reporters from being manipulated. Some ideas: Train your newsroom in disinformation tactics and techniques; do more reporting that helps explain the issues that are often the subjects of disinformation campaigns.