3 to read: ‘Darth’ D’Vorkin at LA Times | Ben Shapiro: The thinking conservative | ‘Engagement reporter’?

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 27, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. ‘Darth’ D’Vorkin: LA journalism’s ‘Prince of Darkness’: If you think things are bad at the LA Times now, get ready — they could get a whole lot worse. The new editor in chief, Lewis D’Vorkin comes across as a someone willing to sell his ethical standards for a few million clicks, give a take a hundred thousand. Just what the Times needs, what with reports of their new publisher’s history of harassment. Hang in there, Times newsroom. Story for CJR by Lyz Lenz.

2. Is Ben Shapiro a conservative liberals can count on?: Despite the obviously partisan take, this is a great read about a fast-rising conservative writer and podcaster who is not a mindless follower of Trump. Shapiro comes across as a brilliant intellectual with points to make, and if he ticks off fellow conservatives, well, that’s just too bad. Nice story by Seth Stevenson for Slate.

3. What the heck is an ‘engagement reporter’?: Newsrooms have dived deep into the “engagement” pool. The problem is that no one quite agrees what the heck that means. A survey of those with the label finds that those reporters are still working to define their exact roles. Interesting story on an evolving idea, by Taylor Blatchford for MediaShift.

Bonus read: How an undercover female reporter exposed sexual misconduct at a London charity bash: Men behaving badly is not exactly a breaking news story these days. But Madison Marriage, working for the Financial Times, covered a top-shelf charity event — for men only — and discovered a level of abuse and boorishness towards young women hostesses that boggles the mind. Marriage reported that men of all ages were pawing at the young hostesses, many college students. It’s a remarkable story that has rocked England. Great read by William Booth and Fred Barbash in the WaPo.

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

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3 to read: Inside the secretive world of WikiLeaks | Membership plan or no? | End of ‘The Awl’ = End of fun on Internet

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 20, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Inside the secretive world of Julian Assange & WikiLeaks: Wikileaks impact on journalism has been immense, from releasing hacked Democratic emails to US documents tied to Afghanistan. Yet surprisingly little is know about the world that has been created by its founder, Julian Assange. Washington Post reporter Ellen Nakashima talks and tags along with a quirky, paranoid German hacker, one of Assange’s few friends, gaining some insight into a dark and secretive corner of the world. Interesting take.

2. Figuring out if a membership plan is your newsroom’s best path forward (or not): Newsrooms increasingly are looking with envy at those sites that have blossoming membership plans. But Emily Goligoski of the Membership Puzzle Project throws cold water on newsrooms that are not willing or able to work intensely with their audiences. Creating a successful membership model is a serious, time-intensive commitment. Good stuff.

3. ‘The End of the Awl and the Vanishing of Freedom and Fun from the Internet’: OK, I grant you: The hedline (not mine) is an overstatement. But it’s still a wonderful read by Jia Tolentino for The New Yorker on how special quirky places for writers are getting squashed flat by the mega-corporate platforms. Read it and lament the loss of The Awl, even if you were not a reader.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: ‘Media men’ list creator outs herself | What FB’s news feed changes mean | Reporter nightmare: When a subject of an investigation kills himself

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 13, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. The ‘Shitty Media Men’ list creator outs herself: The anonymous, crowdsourced list was supposed to be a simple Google spreadsheet, shared privately, of men in media who had (supposedly) sexually harassed or assaulted women. The privacy didn’t last long — within a few hours the list had exploded, both in reach and in the number of names added. Then, of course, the search for the author started. But before anyone published her name, Moira Donegan outed herself. Here’s the inside story of what the list was supposed to be, what it became, and the pushback she encountered.

2. What Facebook’s changes to its news feed mean (& how to adapt). Here’s two quick takes: WGBH breaks down what the changes mean for your newsroom, and has specific suggestions on what to do. And Simon Galperin on Medium suggests finding alternative channels, emphasizing social sharing, and cultivating Facebook groups. Good tips here.

3. Reporter’s nightmare: When the subject of an investigation kills himself: Reporters love to do kickass investigations. But what happens if the subject of the investigations kills himself? It can be shocking and emotionally devastating, for the reporter and newsroom. This is how KyCIR handled that very situation. It’s a fascinating read on how to confront a horrible issue head-on, with sensitivity and professionalism. Great read by Meg Dalton for CJR.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: Fighting for press freedom | YouTube in crisis (again) | Making the NYT better

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 6, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Fighting against government’s war on press freedom: James Risen’s unflinching reporting about the government’s illegal operations and spying on its own citizens led to years of blistering conflict with the White House and other agencies. But the former NYT reporter also had intense bureaucratic battles with his own editors about getting stories told. Risen details for The Intercept a compelling behind-the-scenes (and long) account of his fights. Interestingly, the stories of the NYT infighting are just as fascinating as the rest.

2. Logan Paul suicide video shows YouTube is facing a crucial turning point — again: YouTube has had trouble policing what gets posted to its site and has been criticized for its uneven hand in applying its own community standards. A recent video by one of its most prominent boggers, showing a suicide victim in Japan, drives home how difficult it is for the video platform to act as an editor for what should and should not be shown on it site. Part of the problem, critics point out, is that YouTube encourages boundary-pushing by emphasizing clicks. So in essence, the controversy is inevitable. An interesting piece by Davey Alba for BuzzFeed News.

3. How to make the New York Times a *lot* better: Margaret Sullivan, the WaPo’s media columnist and former public editor at the NYT, is encouraged by the appointment of the NYT’s new publisher, Arthur G. Sulzberger. But the country’s “paper of record” must be willing to give up what she calls its addiction to power, which she feels allows those in government and business to use the news pages for their own good. An interesting take from one of the best media writers today.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.