Conversations: New frameworks for public discourse

A conference on media innovation in an era of fragmented communities: March 31 at Northeastern University

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

The public is increasingly fragmented in how it consumes information, with change driven by newly emerging media and ever-shifting cultural trends.

At the same time, how and why we communicate and what constitutes viable information has gained new tools, contexts and constituencies. The media needs to focus on effective, fact-based communication as it takes on on problems that span politics, policies and research.

The conference is called: “Conversations: New frameworks for public discourse. Exploring the role of media innovation, emerging modes of communication and digital storytelling in an era of fragmented communities.”

It’s being held on on Friday, March 31, at Northeastern University in Boston.

If you are interested in attending, more information and registration details are here. The event is free. We hope to see you there.

Media needs to leverages the art and science of communication to promote civil discussion about the most pressing and complex problems facing society — bridging technological infrastructures, data analytics, information visualization, and public engagement expertise.

Increasingly, information is consumed by the public in diverse ways as the definition of news evolves, and communication itself is reshaped by cultural trends and emerging technology.

Within this fluid environment, the media has a unique capacity to drive fact-based storytelling that leverages the art and the science of communication.

What tools, contexts and constituencies can media bring to bear to promote civil discussion about the complex, pressing problems facing fragmented communities today?

How can media effectively bridge technological infrastructures, data analytics, information visualization, and public engagement to serve multifaceted audiences and participants?

Join us on March 31 at Northeastern University as we meet with a broad range of journalists and communicators from across the country, eager to address these questions and to search for new frameworks for promoting civil discussion.

The conference is sponsored by Northeastern’s College of Arts, Media & Design.

We’re planning an exciting day of panels, panelists, and table discussions. Here are the panels:

  • True listening beyond the data: Making sure we hear and understand the people behind the numbers
  • How to foster reasoned public dialogue on issues of diversity & difference
  • Preparing journalists to “co-create”: Working with the communities they serve in reporting the news
  • Are we hard-wired for hard conversations? Navigating the cultural and neurobiological obstacles to communicating across difference.

Matt Carroll is a professor-of-the-practice in the Journalism Department at Northeastern University.

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3 to read: NYT & WaPo do battle | Why journos make it up | The fake news pandemic of ‘42

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

March 21, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.

The NYT and WaPo are at war — and everyone wins (except Trump): Who doesn’t like an old-fashioned newspaper war? The Times and Post are breaking scoop after competitive scoop, as they dig deep into the Trump administration. In some ways Trump’s election has focused attention on a fight between two of the country’s premier newsrooms, a battle that began three years ago when Marty Baron took the reins of the Post. Good read by Benjamin Mullin of Poynter. Related bonus story: (and also by Ben): The competition for good investigative reporters heats up.
2. Why writers lie (& plagiarize & fabricate & …): A fascinating look at why writers and journalists make stuff up — and what happens to them afterwards. There’s a certain fascination with reading about reporters who go off the rails, maybe akin to rubbernecking at traffic accidents. Anyways, the best stuff is about Clifford Irving, in the second half of the article by Paul Elie for Vanity Fair.
3. Lessons from the fake news pandemic of 1942: Fake news ain’t new news. Consider the inflammatory stories during WWII, when rumors spread through the former Confederate states that First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was secretly organizing black women into “Eleanor Clubs,” spreading fear among whites that a race rebellion was coming. The rumors eventually died, but their spread has lessons for today. An interesting look back by Joshua Zeitz for Politico.
  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll is a journalism professor at Northeastern University.

3 to read: Creating civil conversation | Twitter grows up (subtly) | Hollywood gets it wrong about WaPo

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

March 14, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.

  1. When a news site works to create civil conversation: This story is cool on two levels. First, it’s about how Red and Blue pro-Trump and pro-Hillary voters can be brought together and guided through a civil conversation about their differences. That part is wonderful. But it’s also a less obvious story about how a new type of news site is navigating uncharted waters in an attempt to create much tighter engagement with its readers. Great piece by Monica Guzman of The Evergrey. (Related: “Conversations,” a conference at Northeastern U about how media can build bridges between fractured communities.)
Image: Leigh Carroll (Instagram: @leighzaah)

2. Twitter grows up (subtly):Not so long ago, Twitter’s obituary was being written, as its growth stalled — perceived as death for social media sites. But the quirky 140-character site has been hard at work revamping, in subtle but important ways, which have increased its relevance. (And of course there’s a “Trump Bump” because of the Twitter-in-chief’s penchant for 3 a.m. mini rants.) Good work by Will Oremus at Slate.

3. Pentagon Papers movie about WaPo? Sorry, it should be NYT:Hollywood, you got it wrong, argues Robert J. McNamara in Poynter. A movie, starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, is planned about how the Washington Post handled its publication of the Pentagon Papers. But McNamara argues (convincingly) that the movie should be about the New York Times, which published first. An interesting look back at an important chapter in journalism history.

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll is a journalism professor at Northeastern University.

Conversations: New frameworks for public discourse

A conference on media innovation in an era of fragmented communities: March 31 at Northeastern University

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

The public is increasingly fragmented in how it consumes information, with change driven by newly emerging media and ever-shifting cultural trends.

At the same time, how and why we communicate and what constitutes viable information has gained new tools, contexts and constituencies. The media needs to focus on effective, fact-based communication as it takes on on problems that span politics, policies and research.

The conference is called: “Conversations: New frameworks for public discourse. Exploring the role of media innovation, emerging modes of communication and digital storytelling in an era of fragmented communities.”

It’s being held on on Friday, March 31, at Northeastern University in Boston.

If you are interested in attending, more information and registration details are here. The event is free. We hope to see you there.

Media needs to leverages the art and science of communication to promote civil discussion about the most pressing and complex problems facing society — bridging technological infrastructures, data analytics, information visualization, and public engagement expertise.

Increasingly, information is consumed by the public in diverse ways as the definition of news evolves, and communication itself is reshaped by cultural trends and emerging technology.

Within this fluid environment, the media has a unique capacity to drive fact-based storytelling that leverages the art and the science of communication.

What tools, contexts and constituencies can media bring to bear to promote civil discussion about the complex, pressing problems facing fragmented communities today?

How can media effectively bridge technological infrastructures, data analytics, information visualization, and public engagement to serve multifaceted audiences and participants?

Join us on March 31 at Northeastern University as we meet with a broad range of journalists and communicators from across the country, eager to address these questions and to search for new frameworks for promoting civil discussion.

The conference is sponsored by Northeastern’s College of Arts, Media & Design.

We’re planning an exciting day of panels, panelists, and table discussions. Here are the panels:

  • True listening beyond the data: Making sure we hear and understand the people behind the numbers
  • How to foster reasoned public dialogue on issues of diversity & difference
  • Preparing journalists to “co-create”: Working with the communities they serve in reporting the news
  • Are we hard-wired for hard conversations? Navigating the cultural and neurobiological obstacles to communicating across difference.

Matt Carroll is a professor-of-the-practice in the Journalism Department at Northeastern University.