3 to read: 9 core ideas on newsroom inno | Revealing a source | Post Facebook: Reporter’s guide

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

July 13, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. 9 core ideas around journalistic innovation: If you visited 50-plus journalism innovators across America and Europe, what common factors would you find? Start with that the most successful at engaging audiences and growing revenue are breaking a host of old newsroom true-isms. For instance, how about challenging the idea of staying neutral and instead working hard at informing people what they stand for. Or actively involving readers in everything from coming up with ideas to research, helping to become more transparent. These are some of the nine core ideas found by Per Westergaard and Soren Schultz Jorgensen who spent a year visiting newsrooms. Interesting stuff here.

2. Matter of conscience: Why a journalist revealed her source to the FBI: In the argumentative world of journalism, where any two reporters can’t even agree on what pizza to order, there is one rule that everyone agrees on: Never reveal your sources. But that’s exactly what was done Marcy Wheeler, who writes the emptywheel blog, which focuses on national security. Wheeler, startlingly, turned in her source to the FBI. Her reasons are still murky, but it involves Russian interference with the election. A fascinating read by Margaret Sullivan of the WaPo, with more to come, I’m sure.

3. Reporters’ guide: Why semi-open platforms like WhatsApp are replacing open platforms like Facebook: Facebook is losing ground as a place for news. But other closed and semi-open platforms like WhatsApp, subreddits, and closed Facebook groups are gaining ground. A guide by Mark Frankel, social media editor at the BBC, on how reporters can crack the code and find stories and sources.

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3 to read: Mainstream media misses rise of left, too | Good local news = better democracy| Change tactics to get whole story

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

July 7, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. It’s not just that mainstream media missed the Trump wave…: Mainstream media was (justifiably) criticized for missing the rise of Trump. Now the same phenomenon appears to be happening on the left — mainstream media appears to be clueless about the rise of a left wing wave of support, as seen in the primary win of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over establishment favorite Congressman Joe Crowley in new York. A nice piece by Jon Allsop for CJR on the media fumblings of political coverage and what needs to be done.

2. Support local news — it’s crucial to our democracy: There’s a bitter lesson to be learned from the massacre at the Capital Gazette — it’s about the value of local news. Alberto Ibarguen, former publisher of the Miami Herald and president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, writes a stirring reminder that it’s local newsrooms that are the bedrock of our understanding of what’s happening in our community. A good read and a nice reminder, following a horrible incident.

3. Complicating the Narratives: How to get the whole story: Let’s face it: Life is messy. Which can make writing a story difficult, if a journalist is trying to squeeze excess messiness into a comfortable narrative. That’s what makes this article by Amanda Ripley for the Solutions Journalism Network so interesting. It’s a great primer on how to better interview and act with people. That may result in a more complicated, way nuanced story — which is good, she argues, because it better reflects people in the real world.

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Matt Carroll, a former member of the Boston Globe Spotlight team, teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: Solutions journalism at its best | NPR guide to immersive storytelling | LA Times: Life after tronc

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

June 30, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Solutions journalism at its best: News outlets join forces to track down children separated from their parents: There’s a lot of talk about solutions journalism. This is a great example. A bunch of very different news sites — BuzzFeed, ProPub, The Intercept, Univision, and others — are joining together to get information about children separated from their parents by the US. They are doing this by asking for tips from readers. It’s a great idea. Let’s hope we see more of this outside the box thinking.

NPR’s guide to building immersive storytelling projects: Storytelling is getting more complicated — more newsroom players, more tools, greater impact. Yet the process for building the stories is different at every news organization, and sometimes from story to story, as people struggle to create new storytelling systems. NPR is working to create a replicable system for storytelling. Here’s how they do it. Good stuff by Wesley Lindamood of NPR’s Digital Content Team.

3. Life after tronc: Norman Pearlstine’s plans for the LA Times: Pearlstine has cred. And the 75-year-old veteran of Time and the WSJ, among other newsrooms, will need every crumb of it as he takes over a newsroom that was shaken to the roots by the awful management of tronc (which gets my vote for dumbest news name ever). Pearlstine comes across as the right guy for the next few years, careful about what he is promising but stressing quality journalism. Hopefully he, and the LA Times, do well. An interesting interview by Shaya Tayefe Mohajer for CJR.

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Matt Carroll, a former member of the Boston Globe Spotlight team, teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: Twitter’s unlikely comeback | Krauthammer: Inspiration to disabled | When paywalls make decisions

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

June 23, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. How Twitter made the tech world’s most unlikely comeback: Twitter is one of journalists’ favorite tools. Which meant I was a sad puppy a couple of years back the company when the RIPs started, as it shed users and was overrun with a troll infestation. But a funny thing happened. The company made an amazing comeback. This is Twitter’s success story. By Alex Kantrowitz of BuzzFeed.

2. ‘Charles Krauthammer inspired journalists with disabilities, including me’: Charles Krauthammer, the great columnist for the WaPo and commentator for Fox, died this past week. What some people may not know is that he was paralyzed from the waist down, as the result of a diving accident. His disability did nothing to slow him down. As a matter of fact, he helped inspire a number of other journalists with disabilities. A touching read by Cal Borchers of the WaPo.

3. When the paywall decides when to ask you to pay: Most paywalls are simple — read five or 10 articles, then a readers get asked to buy a subscription. Maybe they will, maybe they won’t, but it’s a blunt approach. Swiss news publisher NZZ is building a much subtler system and claiming excellent results. They use machine learning that takes in more than a hundred points of information, from how much time is spent on articles to device and time of day. The algorithm calculates the best point to ask an individual to subscribe. I can see a lot of places following this approach. Lucinda Southern for DigiDay.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.