3 to read: WordPress unveiling CMS | AR’s newsroom moment | FB flubs its 10-year challenge

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 19, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

WordPress unveils a toolkit for local newsrooms: Reporters and editors love to bitch about their crappy CMS system, with good reason. Most of them stink. But there is some action towards improving them (talking about you, WaPo’s Arc). Finally, WordPress is diving into the fray. Honestly, it seems late to me. If there was an organization perfectly set up to dive into this years ago, it seems it would be them. But still, good news. Story by Christine Schmidtfor NiemanLab.

Augmented reality is having its newsroom moment: More and more publishers are sticking their toes in the AR and VR waters, testing how they can best use it in newsrooms. Let’s hope it’s not a “pivot to video” kind of moment. Max Willensfor Digiday.

How benign is Facebook’s ’10 Year Challenge’? Maybe it’s not that harmless, at all: My 10-year challenge is this: A decade ago, I would not have thought twice about posting pictures of myself up. Now… hmmm, what could possibly go wrong, since it involves the increasingly creepy Facebook? No thanks, FB. Good read by Kate O’Neill for Wired.

3 to read: Saying No to Trump | Censorship factories | Tips to deal with disinformation

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 12, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Why networks should say No to Trump: The president addressed the nation about immigration last week. Margaret Sullivan at the WaPo argues convincingly that the networks should turn away from Trump, next time he wants to use free air time to spread “propaganda.” In his talk, the president offered up no news, but did repeat again and again exaggerated and false information. So what’s the point?, she asks. A good read.

A peek inside China’s ‘censorship factories’: China is big on censoring news, whether it’s about certain political issues or an ominous empty chair. No news there. But the NYT provides a glimpse of what’s like to work inside one of the “censorship factories,” where low-paid people work to scrub the words of 800 million daily users. It’s a fascinating take.

5 lessons for reporting in an age of disinformation: Good tips from Claire Wardle at First Draft News about how to train reporters from being manipulated. Some ideas: Train your newsroom in disinformation tactics and techniques; do more reporting that helps explain the issues that are often the subjects of disinformation campaigns.

3 to read: Saying No to Trump | Censorship factories | Tips to deal with disinformation

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 12, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Why networks should say No to Trump: The president addressed the nation about immigration last week. Margaret Sullivan at the WaPo argues convincingly that the networks should turn away from Trump, next time he wants to use free air time to spread “propaganda.” In his talk, the president offered up no news, but did repeat again and again exaggerated and false information. So what’s the point?, she asks. A good read.

A peek inside China’s ‘censorship factories’: China is big on censoring news, whether it’s about certain political issues or an ominous empty chair. No news there. But the NYT provides a glimpse of what’s like to work inside one of the “censorship factories,” where low-paid people work to scrub the words of 800 million daily users. It’s a fascinating take.

5 lessons for reporting in an age of disinformation: Good tips from Claire Wardle at First Draft News about how to train reporters from being manipulated. Some ideas: Train your newsroom in disinformation tactics and techniques; do more reporting that helps explain the issues that are often the subjects of disinformation campaigns.

3 to read: Bottomless Pinocchio | Good Google? Gone | Congress misses its chance

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 15, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

The WaPo’s ‘Bottomless Pinocchio’: A new rating for a false claim repeated over and over again: Love this. You have to give the WaPo credit for their aggressive coverage of Trump. For instance, not so long ago, a politician caught lying would be embarrassed enough to stop repeating the lie. Not Trump. So the WaPo has upped its game w this interesting new system for ranking repeat liars. Kudos to Glenn Kessler.

What happened to the good Google?: Google’s Dragonfly will intensify surveillance of journalists in China: Many Google watchers and company employees were shocked when they found out the search company was working hand-in-hand with the Chinese gov’t to create a censorship-compliant search engine. When word leaked out, it caused protests within the company. Well, apparently they weren’t enough to derail the project. Money talks, and the Chinese market is too big to give up over the principles of democracy, apparently. Mia Shuang Li for CJR.

The missed point of Google’s Congressional hearing: Congress had a chance to dig deep into Google’s business practices and how they can hurt consumers across the country, notes Charlie Warzel of BuzzFeed. So did pols look at how people are tracked? Or how their personal data is sold? No. Instead pols focused on perceived political bias, asking shallow questions. And not surprisingly, the Google CEO gave evasive answers. All in all, a chance to shine a little light on the internal workings of one of the most influential corporations in the world was flubbed.