3 to read: ‘Media men’ list creator outs herself | What FB’s news feed changes mean | Reporter nightmare: When a subject of an investigation kills himself

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 13, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. The ‘Shitty Media Men’ list creator outs herself: The anonymous, crowdsourced list was supposed to be a simple Google spreadsheet, shared privately, of men in media who had (supposedly) sexually harassed or assaulted women. The privacy didn’t last long — within a few hours the list had exploded, both in reach and in the number of names added. Then, of course, the search for the author started. But before anyone published her name, Moira Donegan outed herself. Here’s the inside story of what the list was supposed to be, what it became, and the pushback she encountered.

2. What Facebook’s changes to its news feed mean (& how to adapt). Here’s two quick takes: WGBH breaks down what the changes mean for your newsroom, and has specific suggestions on what to do. And Simon Galperin on Medium suggests finding alternative channels, emphasizing social sharing, and cultivating Facebook groups. Good tips here.

3. Reporter’s nightmare: When the subject of an investigation kills himself: Reporters love to do kickass investigations. But what happens if the subject of the investigations kills himself? It can be shocking and emotionally devastating, for the reporter and newsroom. This is how KyCIR handled that very situation. It’s a fascinating read on how to confront a horrible issue head-on, with sensitivity and professionalism. Great read by Meg Dalton for CJR.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattCData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

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3 to read: Fighting for press freedom | YouTube in crisis (again) | Making the NYT better

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 6, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Fighting against government’s war on press freedom: James Risen’s unflinching reporting about the government’s illegal operations and spying on its own citizens led to years of blistering conflict with the White House and other agencies. But the former NYT reporter also had intense bureaucratic battles with his own editors about getting stories told. Risen details for The Intercept a compelling behind-the-scenes (and long) account of his fights. Interestingly, the stories of the NYT infighting are just as fascinating as the rest.

2. Logan Paul suicide video shows YouTube is facing a crucial turning point — again: YouTube has had trouble policing what gets posted to its site and has been criticized for its uneven hand in applying its own community standards. A recent video by one of its most prominent boggers, showing a suicide victim in Japan, drives home how difficult it is for the video platform to act as an editor for what should and should not be shown on it site. Part of the problem, critics point out, is that YouTube encourages boundary-pushing by emphasizing clicks. So in essence, the controversy is inevitable. An interesting piece by Davey Alba for BuzzFeed News.

3. How to make the New York Times a *lot* better: Margaret Sullivan, the WaPo’s media columnist and former public editor at the NYT, is encouraged by the appointment of the NYT’s new publisher, Arthur G. Sulzberger. But the country’s “paper of record” must be willing to give up what she calls its addiction to power, which she feels allows those in government and business to use the news pages for their own good. An interesting take from one of the best media writers today.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: WaPo goes transparent | NYT’s own sex scandal | How Breitbart declared war on Twitter

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 16, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. How the WaPo broke the Roy Moore story & got more transparent: First, this is interesting piece for journalists curious about how the WaPo got the story. But secondly — and maybe more importantly — it’s eye opening for people outside the business, who might wonder how “sausage is made.” It’s the Post’s first story in what will be a series in “deconstructing the journalistic process.” It’s also a great example of how newsrooms can be more transparent and can increase trust when the public has become increasingly skeptical and cynical about the media.

2. Scandal at the NYT: Investigation into allegations against star reporter Glenn Thrush: There’s no shortage of irony here. The New York Times, after all, kicked off the blistering #metoo movement with its incredible reporting on Weinstein. Now, one of its star White House reporters has been suspended after a report in Vox about how Thrush allegedly made moves on younger female reporters. This Vanity Fair piece by Joe Pompeo describes a strong response from the NYT: Dozens interviewed in rigorous interviews. Stay tuned.

3. How Bannon, Milo & Breitbart declared war on Twitter: BuzzFeed has written a fascinating inside look at how Breitbart’s Steve Bannon roared into battle against Twitter, convinced that the tweet machine was blocking conservative voices and banning his employees, including then-star Milo Yiannopoulos. “Should we sue Twitter?” Yiannopoulos wrote in an email to Bannon. “Already talked to lawyers,” replied Bannon. A tale about how Bannon unleashed Breitbart against Twitter, trying their best to hurt the social network. Great work by Joseph Bernstein and Ryan Mac.

BTW: Taking holiday time. Next post on Jan. 13.

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: WaPo goes transparent | NYT’s own sex scandal | How Breitbart declared war on Twitter

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 16, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. How the WaPo broke the Roy Moore story: First, this is interesting piece for journalists curious about how the WaPo got the story. But secondly — and maybe more importantly — it’s eye opening for people outside the business, who might wonder how “sausage is made.” It’s the Post’s first story in what will be a series in “deconstructing the journalistic process.” It’s also a great example of how newsrooms can be more transparent and can increase trust when the public has become increasingly skeptical and cynical about the media.

2. Scandal at the NYT: Investigation into allegations against star reporter Glenn Thrush: There’s no shortage of irony here. The New York Times, after all, kicked off the blistering #metoo movement with its incredible reporting on Weinstein. Now, one of its star White House reporters has been suspended after a report in Vox about how Thrush allegedly made moves on younger female reporters. This Vanity Fair piece by Joe Pompeo describes a strong response from the NYT: Dozens interviewed in rigorous interviews. Stay tuned.

3. How Bannon, Milo & Breitbart declared war on Twitter: BuzzFeed has written a fascinating inside look at how Breitbart’s Steve Bannon roared into battle against Twitter, convinced that the tweet machine was blocking conservative voices and banning his employees, including then-star Milo Yiannopoulos. “Should we sue Twitter?” Yiannopoulos wrote in an email to Bannon. “Already talked to lawyers,” replied Bannon. A tale about how Bannon unleashed Breitbart against Twitter, trying their best to hurt the social network. Great work by Joseph Bernstein and Ryan Mac.

BTW: Taking holiday time. Next post on Jan. 13.

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

Logo by Leigh Carroll <Instagram: @Leighzaaah>