Newsmax election denialism | The Inquirer’s service journalism | TV can’t be like Twitter

Newsmax election denialism: Newsmax, a cable news show you might never have heard about, is making a play for Fox viewers who are upset that the Murdoch station has taken a (slightly) skeptical view of the falsehood that there was widespread voting fraud in the presidential election. Newsmax is diving deep into conspiracy theories and it seems to be paying off. Newsmax has seen it’s highest ratings with 800,000 tuning in and many people, including with Trump, sharing clips and retweets.

The Inquirer’s service journalism : Why invest in service journalism? For the Philly Inquirer, it’s about creating stories that are “actionable and accessible,” says Megan Griffith-Greene, the Inquirer’s service features editor. She says: “Actionable stories are useful and practical; they help people make better decisions. Accessible stories mean they are easy to read, understand and remember, and we use a variety of techniques to break up the text and make it easier to absorb.”

TV can’t be like Twitter: It may be an odd thing to be reminded about, but the major TV networks are not Twitter, or any other social media platform. That fact was driven home during a Nov. 5 press conference by President Trump, who falsely said massive voter fraud had stolen the election from him. As soon as he started on his rant, the networks — ABC, CBS, NBC, and Univision — cut away to tell people that there was evidence for Trump’s statements.

How news sites reported on the lengthy election | Media suppression in Nigeria | NYT’s soaring digital subscriptions

How news sites reported on the lengthy election: How did newsrooms handle the lengthy election cycle? WaPo reporter Marisa Lati said many focused on the “ambiguity of the race and the unsettled national mood.” Lati reported how Julie Moos, executive director of the National Press Club Journalism Institute, thought how newspapers such the Arizona Republic (“Divided Nation Waits”) had one of the strongest displays, while others  newspapers stuck with cautious language and/or data maps to highlight the progress of the polls. Others, like the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, were accused of confusing American’s by using “Trump: I have Won, Biden: It’s not Over!” as a headline.

Media suppression in Nigeria: Reporter, Ivie Ani, reports on how Nigeria’s media suppression came to light after the country came together back in October to protest corruption and police brutality in the country, also calling for the abolition of Nigeria’s Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), which soon after ended up to be known as “the Lekki Massacre” referred by Nigerian media outlets. This caused the National Broadcasting Commission (NBC), Nigeria’s media regulator, to release some guidelines that were seen as an attempt to censor media outlets reporting, creating suppression while the government was hiding vital information and details about the attacks that happened during the protest. This followed with the NBC’s penalization on the coverage of #EndSARS, alongside many media outlets being fined for trying to report on the matter which further proved the media suppression being established in Nigeria.

NYT’s soaring digital subscriptions: Fox and Trump have tied themselves together tightly. But what happens after the election? Well, Sarah Ellison and Jeremy Barr of the WaPo explain how Rupert Murdoch, whose family controls Fox News parent company, has a plan. The conservative Murdoch that Biden’s possible election will become the new topic of conversation for the news site, as he gave hope that Trump would win because of what he considers repeated “unforced errors.”

Fox’s Future After The Election | The Time’s ‘Anonymous’ Charade | Influential Food Editor’s Retirement

Fox’s Future After The Election: Fox and Trump have tied themselves together tightly. But what happens after the election? Well, Sarah Ellison and Jeremy Barr of the WaPo explain how Rupert Murdoch, whose family controls Fox News parent company, has a plan. The conservative Murdoch that Biden’s possible election will become the new topic of conversation for the news site, as he gave hope that Trump would win because of what he considers repeated “unforced errors.”

The Time’s ‘Anonymous’ Charade : WaPo reporter Erik Wemple describes the impact of the revelation of the identity of “Anonymous,” the alleged high-level official whose oped piece in the NYT caused a national stir, with its description of chaos within the Trump administration. But Miles Taylor, who revealed he was Anonymous, was a former Department of Homeland Security official, but hardly a high-level official. It’s turned into a black eye for the NYT.


Influential Food Editor’s Retirement: Kristen Hare, Poynter reporter, writes in this story about a food editor at the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Lee Svitak Dean has retired after 40 years. Hare explains Dean’s favorite memory as a food editor, which is when she spent the morning with Phua and Blia Thao at their 13-acre farm in Spring Valley, Wisconsin. For 26 years, Dean’s work has been seen as more than stories about food. She has had the opportunity to experience food by learning about different cultures, having meaningful conversations with her sources and learning about the community and the people who live in it, and her work was even considered to be a big change in local food journalism. Dean’s retirement  follows the departure of Nancy Stohs from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in January, and it marks the end of a golden age of local print food sections.

Journalists’ impact on racial injustice | CNN vs Tucker Carlson: It’s not pretty | Newspapers lose their “iron core”

Journalists’ impact on racial injustice:With race yet again a front-page issue in the U.S., from Black Lives Matter marches to inequality, what can journalists do to help solve some of these knotty issues? Ashton Lattimore in Poynter explains how journalists can do more than just report on racial injustices. Journalists can also tell stories with impact that can inspire empathy in their readers, to help build community values for fighting injustice.

CNN vs Tucker Carlson: It’s not pretty: It is no secret that Tucker Carlson’s show has been very controversial in regards to many topics, most including politics. In this story written by the Washington Post’s reporter, Erik Wemple, it is explained how CNN stepped in to clear up some research that was showcased in Carlson’s show. Carlson invited Chinese virologist Li-Meng Yan onto his show, where she shared that China had engineered SARS-CoV-2 and unleashed it on the world, something she said she found upon research. Although Yan was invited by Carlson, Carlson himself admitted that he did not have the “grounding to properly vet Yan’s claims,” which resulted on CNN stepping in to debunk Yan’s claims within her research.

Newspapers lose their “iron core”: Joshua Benton for Nieman Lab writes how local papers are giving up on covering local government — in essence, dropping a beat that is essential for democracy. They are losing focus on their “iron core,” a phrase created by Alex S. Jones that represents the “big and unwieldy, reflecting each day’s combined output of all the professional journalism done by news organizations.”