3 to read: Fighting for press freedom | YouTube in crisis (again) | Making the NYT better

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 6, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Fighting against government’s war on press freedom: James Risen’s unflinching reporting about the government’s illegal operations and spying on its own citizens led to years of blistering conflict with the White House and other agencies. But the former NYT reporter also had intense bureaucratic battles with his own editors about getting stories told. Risen details for The Intercept a compelling behind-the-scenes (and long) account of his fights. Interestingly, the stories of the NYT infighting are just as fascinating as the rest.

2. Logan Paul suicide video shows YouTube is facing a crucial turning point — again: YouTube has had trouble policing what gets posted to its site and has been criticized for its uneven hand in applying its own community standards. A recent video by one of its most prominent boggers, showing a suicide victim in Japan, drives home how difficult it is for the video platform to act as an editor for what should and should not be shown on it site. Part of the problem, critics point out, is that YouTube encourages boundary-pushing by emphasizing clicks. So in essence, the controversy is inevitable. An interesting piece by Davey Alba for BuzzFeed News.

3. How to make the New York Times a *lot* better: Margaret Sullivan, the WaPo’s media columnist and former public editor at the NYT, is encouraged by the appointment of the NYT’s new publisher, Arthur G. Sulzberger. But the country’s “paper of record” must be willing to give up what she calls its addiction to power, which she feels allows those in government and business to use the news pages for their own good. An interesting take from one of the best media writers today.

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Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

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3 to read: Reporting a timeline, pixel by pixel | Cool dataviz: ‘You draw it’ | Millennials *will* pay for news

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Oct. 28, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. The Las Vegas shooting: How to report a timeline, pixel by pixel: In a series of tweets, Malachy Browne, a producer in the NYT’s video unit, basically conducts a master class on how to build a complicated timeline by combining a number of video clips. It’s a fascinating tweet stream. (Click on the tweet linked in the story to see all the tweets.) It’s a great learning experience, even for experienced reporters.

Logo by Leigh Carroll (Instagram: @Leighzaah

2. Simply, a cool NYT dataviz: ‘You draw it’: Another great example from the NYT, which continues to do top-notch data viz. “You draw it: Just how bad is the drug overdose epidemic?” informs, while providing (grim) information about how Americans have died over the past few decades in everything from car crashes to opioids. (Check out the crazy AIDS timeline.) Kudos to their graphics team and Josh Katz, who did this one.

3. Maybe the apocalypse isn’t *that* close: Millennials are paying for news: The commonly accepted wisdom is that millennials won’t crack open their wallets for news. Maybe that needs a digital update. Millennials — in increasing numbers — are paying, according to an impressive collection of publications: The Atlantic, NYT, WaPo, WSJ, and the Economist, among others. Driving the surge? Millennials are getting used to paying for digital content through sites such as Netflix, while the “Trump bump” gets some credit too.

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Cool upcoming event:

The-Future-of-Investigative-Reporting_11-31-17

Is Trump Making Investigative Reporting Great Again?

When: Fri. Nov. 17

Where: Cabral Center, O’Bryant African-American Institute

40 Leon St., Northeastern University, Boston

Cost: Free

Register: bit.ly/NUtrumpreport

Keynote speakers: Louise Kiernan, editor in chief, ProPublica Illinois & Eric Umansky, deputy managing editor, Pro Publica

Panels:

  • Is there a market for investigative reporting? (Tom Melville, WBUR; Anne Galloway, VTDigger; Burt Glass, NECIR; David Hurlburt, WCVB)  
  • Tips techniques and tales from investigative reporters (Mike Rezendes, Boston Globe; David Armstrong, StatNews; Casey McDermott, NH Public Radio; Mike Morisy, MuckRock)

 

 

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University.