3 to read: Shiny Things Syndrome | Dealing w editors | Oui: Facebook’s local news problem

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 8, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Journalism has a focus problem: How to combat ‘Shiny Things Syndrome’: In an era when change is a constant, it’s easy for newsrooms to be distracted by the latest and greatest promise to … engage with the audience, restore revenue etc etc. Yet Julie Posetti calls for newsroom to slow down, take a more measured, strategic approach to change. Interesting read, based on her research published in the Journalism Innovation Project for the University of Oxford.

Interesting tips on dealing w newsroom editors: A common complaint, from both young and seasoned reporters, is how to deal with editors who dismiss ideas out of hand or who run roughshod over copy. Here’s some tips on how to deal with what can be a difficult situation, by Wilson Lievano for The GroundTruth Project. Interesting ideas on a perennial problem.

The “Yellow Jackets” riots in France are what happens when Facebook gets involved with local news: Ryan Broderick for BuzzFeedNews argues that changes in the Facebook algorithm to emphasize local news helped lead to the recent riots in France. I’m not entirely convinced by the claims, but it is more evidence that Facebook is fairly clueless about what they have unleashed and are amazingly sluggish about reining in bad actors. It seems they still think of themselves as engineers playing with software, when in fact they are a media company.

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3 to read: Surviving tech | Improving subscriptions | Follow the Texas Trib’s money trail

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 1, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

How to survive the next era of tech (slow down and be mindful): Farhad Manjoo at the NYT is one of the more thoughtful commentators on the world of tech. In this, his last ‘State of the Art’ column, he has advice for consumers on to swim when the sea of technology always seems stormy. (btw: It’s a big swing in advice from his first column five years ago.) Whether you agree or not, he is a reasoned voice and is always interesting.

How to improve subscription registration & payment forms: The devil is in the details, as the saying goes. And it is always an unpleasant surprise to me how often registration and payment forms for news sites are clunky, too long, and confusing. Hello! Newsrooms, wake up, please. Reader revenue is the future. Make it as easy as possible for those readers to subscribe. Some nice examples for API by Gwen Vargo.

Where the Texas Tribunes revenue comes from: As advertising-based revenue models for media collapse, it has become increasingly clear that newsrooms need to lean on a variety of different revenue streams. The Texas Tribune is a shining example of that. Here’s how they do it. Interesting story by Freia Nahser for the Global Editors Network.

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3 to read: Reporting a timeline, pixel by pixel | Cool dataviz: ‘You draw it’ | Millennials *will* pay for news

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Oct. 28, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. The Las Vegas shooting: How to report a timeline, pixel by pixel: In a series of tweets, Malachy Browne, a producer in the NYT’s video unit, basically conducts a master class on how to build a complicated timeline by combining a number of video clips. It’s a fascinating tweet stream. (Click on the tweet linked in the story to see all the tweets.) It’s a great learning experience, even for experienced reporters.

Logo by Leigh Carroll (Instagram: @Leighzaah

2. Simply, a cool NYT dataviz: ‘You draw it’: Another great example from the NYT, which continues to do top-notch data viz. “You draw it: Just how bad is the drug overdose epidemic?” informs, while providing (grim) information about how Americans have died over the past few decades in everything from car crashes to opioids. (Check out the crazy AIDS timeline.) Kudos to their graphics team and Josh Katz, who did this one.

3. Maybe the apocalypse isn’t *that* close: Millennials are paying for news: The commonly accepted wisdom is that millennials won’t crack open their wallets for news. Maybe that needs a digital update. Millennials — in increasing numbers — are paying, according to an impressive collection of publications: The Atlantic, NYT, WaPo, WSJ, and the Economist, among others. Driving the surge? Millennials are getting used to paying for digital content through sites such as Netflix, while the “Trump bump” gets some credit too.

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Cool upcoming event:

The-Future-of-Investigative-Reporting_11-31-17

Is Trump Making Investigative Reporting Great Again?

When: Fri. Nov. 17

Where: Cabral Center, O’Bryant African-American Institute

40 Leon St., Northeastern University, Boston

Cost: Free

Register: bit.ly/NUtrumpreport

Keynote speakers: Louise Kiernan, editor in chief, ProPublica Illinois & Eric Umansky, deputy managing editor, Pro Publica

Panels:

  • Is there a market for investigative reporting? (Tom Melville, WBUR; Anne Galloway, VTDigger; Burt Glass, NECIR; David Hurlburt, WCVB)  
  • Tips techniques and tales from investigative reporters (Mike Rezendes, Boston Globe; David Armstrong, StatNews; Casey McDermott, NH Public Radio; Mike Morisy, MuckRock)

 

 

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University.