3 to read: Shiny Things Syndrome | Dealing w editors | Oui: Facebook’s local news problem

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 8, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

Journalism has a focus problem: How to combat ‘Shiny Things Syndrome’: In an era when change is a constant, it’s easy for newsrooms to be distracted by the latest and greatest promise to … engage with the audience, restore revenue etc etc. Yet Julie Posetti calls for newsroom to slow down, take a more measured, strategic approach to change. Interesting read, based on her research published in the Journalism Innovation Project for the University of Oxford.

Interesting tips on dealing w newsroom editors: A common complaint, from both young and seasoned reporters, is how to deal with editors who dismiss ideas out of hand or who run roughshod over copy. Here’s some tips on how to deal with what can be a difficult situation, by Wilson Lievano for The GroundTruth Project. Interesting ideas on a perennial problem.

The “Yellow Jackets” riots in France are what happens when Facebook gets involved with local news: Ryan Broderick for BuzzFeedNews argues that changes in the Facebook algorithm to emphasize local news helped lead to the recent riots in France. I’m not entirely convinced by the claims, but it is more evidence that Facebook is fairly clueless about what they have unleashed and are amazingly sluggish about reining in bad actors. It seems they still think of themselves as engineers playing with software, when in fact they are a media company.

Advertisements

3 to read: Surviving tech | Improving subscriptions | Follow the Texas Trib’s money trail

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 1, 2018: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

How to survive the next era of tech (slow down and be mindful): Farhad Manjoo at the NYT is one of the more thoughtful commentators on the world of tech. In this, his last ‘State of the Art’ column, he has advice for consumers on to swim when the sea of technology always seems stormy. (btw: It’s a big swing in advice from his first column five years ago.) Whether you agree or not, he is a reasoned voice and is always interesting.

How to improve subscription registration & payment forms: The devil is in the details, as the saying goes. And it is always an unpleasant surprise to me how often registration and payment forms for news sites are clunky, too long, and confusing. Hello! Newsrooms, wake up, please. Reader revenue is the future. Make it as easy as possible for those readers to subscribe. Some nice examples for API by Gwen Vargo.

Where the Texas Tribunes revenue comes from: As advertising-based revenue models for media collapse, it has become increasingly clear that newsrooms need to lean on a variety of different revenue streams. The Texas Tribune is a shining example of that. Here’s how they do it. Interesting story by Freia Nahser for the Global Editors Network.

  • 3 to Read: Get notified about new issues via email: Send an email: 3toread (at) gmail.com

3 to read: Fighting for press freedom | YouTube in crisis (again) | Making the NYT better

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Jan. 6, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. Fighting against government’s war on press freedom: James Risen’s unflinching reporting about the government’s illegal operations and spying on its own citizens led to years of blistering conflict with the White House and other agencies. But the former NYT reporter also had intense bureaucratic battles with his own editors about getting stories told. Risen details for The Intercept a compelling behind-the-scenes (and long) account of his fights. Interestingly, the stories of the NYT infighting are just as fascinating as the rest.

2. Logan Paul suicide video shows YouTube is facing a crucial turning point — again: YouTube has had trouble policing what gets posted to its site and has been criticized for its uneven hand in applying its own community standards. A recent video by one of its most prominent boggers, showing a suicide victim in Japan, drives home how difficult it is for the video platform to act as an editor for what should and should not be shown on it site. Part of the problem, critics point out, is that YouTube encourages boundary-pushing by emphasizing clicks. So in essence, the controversy is inevitable. An interesting piece by Davey Alba for BuzzFeed News.

3. How to make the New York Times a *lot* better: Margaret Sullivan, the WaPo’s media columnist and former public editor at the NYT, is encouraged by the appointment of the NYT’s new publisher, Arthur G. Sulzberger. But the country’s “paper of record” must be willing to give up what she calls its addiction to power, which she feels allows those in government and business to use the news pages for their own good. An interesting take from one of the best media writers today.

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.

3 to read: WaPo goes transparent | NYT’s own sex scandal | How Breitbart declared war on Twitter

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Dec. 16, 2017: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail. Originally published on 3toread.co

  1. How the WaPo broke the Roy Moore story & got more transparent: First, this is interesting piece for journalists curious about how the WaPo got the story. But secondly — and maybe more importantly — it’s eye opening for people outside the business, who might wonder how “sausage is made.” It’s the Post’s first story in what will be a series in “deconstructing the journalistic process.” It’s also a great example of how newsrooms can be more transparent and can increase trust when the public has become increasingly skeptical and cynical about the media.

2. Scandal at the NYT: Investigation into allegations against star reporter Glenn Thrush: There’s no shortage of irony here. The New York Times, after all, kicked off the blistering #metoo movement with its incredible reporting on Weinstein. Now, one of its star White House reporters has been suspended after a report in Vox about how Thrush allegedly made moves on younger female reporters. This Vanity Fair piece by Joe Pompeo describes a strong response from the NYT: Dozens interviewed in rigorous interviews. Stay tuned.

3. How Bannon, Milo & Breitbart declared war on Twitter: BuzzFeed has written a fascinating inside look at how Breitbart’s Steve Bannon roared into battle against Twitter, convinced that the tweet machine was blocking conservative voices and banning his employees, including then-star Milo Yiannopoulos. “Should we sue Twitter?” Yiannopoulos wrote in an email to Bannon. “Already talked to lawyers,” replied Bannon. A tale about how Bannon unleashed Breitbart against Twitter, trying their best to hurt the social network. Great work by Joseph Bernstein and Ryan Mac.

BTW: Taking holiday time. Next post on Jan. 13.

  • Get notified via email: Send a note to 3toread (at) gmail.com

Matt Carroll teaches journalism at Northeastern University. Twitter: @MattcData. Instagram: mattcarroll54.